Leon Dostert, Pioneer of Simultaneous Intepreting at Nuremberg; and More — Translorial Spring 2015 Edition

Translorial Vol 37 No. 1

NCTA members can download the Spring 2015 edition of the Translorial in print and downloadable PDF versions, covering a variety of topics.

If you are not an NCTA member, you can join here.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Table of contents of the Translorial Spring 2015 edition, Vol. 37, No. 1:

  • Isabelle Pouliot, translator and journalist, by Juan Pino-Silva, PhD
    Isabelle Pouliot is a journalist as well as a translator, and a copy of her article on French-American linguist Léon Dostert is featured in this issue. We took the opportunity to meet with the author to learn about her dual career.
    → Read more (members only).
  • Social event reports by Alcira Salguero, Diana Dudgeon, and Richard Markley
    → Read more (members only).
  • Trados Studio 2014 and SDL Open-Exchange workshop, report by Karl Pfeiffer
    Intermediate and advanced Trados Studio users gained valuable insights into the nooks and crannies of this CAT tool in the workshop by Tuomas Kostiainen.
    → Read more (members only).
  • Working into one’s B language, report by Tracy Chen
    Seasoned interpreter Angela Zawadzki provides insight into the challenges of interpreting into one’s B language.
    → Read more (members only).
  • Striking the right note: practical note taking for interpreters — a workshop by Nick Zaheri, report by Bryan Lopuck
    If you Google Aaron Koblin, you’ll get a lot of information on the Creative Director of the Data Arts Team at — yes — Google itself, including the following quote: “They say an elephant never forgets. Well, you are not an elephant. Take notes, constantly.” Easier said than done, perhaps.
    → Read more (members only).
  • Léon Dostert, an exceptional figure, by Isabelle Pouliot, translated from the French by Sean Dodd
    Leon Dostert (1904-1971) played a major role in the early development of simultaneous interpreting. This interpreting mode, which seems so commonplace today, made its actual debut during the Nuremburg trials of 1945-46. Dostert led the team of court interpreters at Nuremberg, and it was he who convinced US prosecutor Robert Jackson to employ simultaneous interpreting instead of consecutive, using a microphone-and-headset system.
    → Read more (members only).
  • Curate that site to prevent its drought — the process of finding good-reads, by Juan Pino-Silva
    “Drought” is a multi-purpose word. As Californians the word currently triggers powerful reactions as we suffer through this amazing State’s longest and most devastating drought in history. So in this case, the word refers to a “prolonged period of abnormally low rainfall.” But when the word is applied to a small, home-based business – such as the professional translator – “drought” refers to a “prolonged absence of income-producing business,” and this is disturbing.
    → Read more (members only).
  • Sleepless in Chicago — NCTA members share presentation experience at ATA 55th Annual Conference, by Rick and Diana Dudgeon
    Our journey began with a delayed flight. We made it in time for the Welcome Reception, but rushing to get there would be just a prelude to the fast-paced days to follow.
    → Read more (members only).
  • Mixed-initiative natural language translation, report by Matsuko Teshima
    Dr. Spence Green from Stanford University shared research findings on human and machine translation collaboration and presented his own web-based mixedinitiative translation application.
    → Read more (members only).
  • Manga for the masses, report by Yuko Fukami
    Author Beth Carey and translator Fred Schodt recount their Collaboration on a two-volume biography of filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki.
    → Read more (members only).
  • In the field with Michael Schubert, by Diana Dudgeon
    Accomplished translator, musician, and cyclist Michael Schubert let us in for a backstage peek into his background and work.
    → Read more (members only).

And more!

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