THE TRANSLORIAL TOOL KIT – GIVING THE FINGERS A BREAK

The Tool Kit is an online newsletter that comes to its subscribers’ mailboxes twice a month. In Translorial, we offer a quarterly digest of Jost’s most helpful tips from the past season. BY JOST ZETZSCHE © 2012 INTERNATIONAL WRITERS’ GROUP, COMPILED BY YVES AVÉROUS

Giving the Fingers a Break
There are a lot of complaints that speech recognition—the ability to dictate to your computer—is geeky technology. But I think the very opposite is true. How geeky is it to hack on a keyboard to make your computer understand what you are trying to say? It makes so much sense to be able to speak to your computer, dictate text, and navigate through programs. The only geeky part about it is that we’re not used to it and that it works—kind of. → continue reading

THE GLAMOUR OF TRANSLATION

Cover of Madame BovaryLydia Davis captivates her audience with musings about her translation of Flaubert’s Madame Bovary. A REPORT BY VERA HAMADY

On the night of April 20th, 150 people waited patiently to hear acclaimed author and translator Lydia Davis talk about her latest translation of Madame Bovary. The event organized by the Center for the Art of Translation took place at the Verdi Club, where attendees were sipping wine in anticipation. When Davis went on stage, she told the crowd that she was happy to be among people interested in translation. Her hour-long reading, punctuated with silences and a sense of humor, captivated the audience, bringing back glamour and excitement to the translation profession. → continue reading

IN WITH THE NEW

NCTA members at the annual brunch in Berkeley

The annual NCTA New Year’s Brunch, held at Skate’s on the Bay on January 23 was, as always, a great success. BY NINA BOGDAN

A group of 37 translators and interpreters gathered to talk shop and socialize at the waterfront restaurant in Berkeley. Even the weather was cooperating. After weeks of rain, it was a wonderful sunny Sunday and the San Francisco city skyline was showcased in the huge picture windows of the restaurant.

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FRENCH ANNUAL REPORTS

A report on David Jemielity’s Session at the ATA Conference. BY SARAH LLEWELLYN

Of the many excellent sessions for French<>English translators at this year’s ATA conference, the two that really stood out for me were those presented by David Jemielity, the French Language Division’s “distinguished speaker.”  Mr. Jemielity is head of translations at Banque Cantonale Vaudoise in Lausanne and a tenured faculty member at the University of Geneva’s School of Translation and Interpretation.

For reasons of space, I am just going to summarize some of the main points of his first presentation, “Why French->English Annual Report Translations Read Like… Translations,” but the good news is that Mr. Jemielity will soon be publishing the material he presented, probably in the ATA Chronicle. → continue reading

THE TOOL KIT – HELP WITH PDFS

BY JOST ZETZSCHE

File Types and Tools
To use PDF files as efficiently as possible, it’s important to know that, from a practical point of view, there are three different types of PDF files:
Text-based files, where text is “real” text and you can copy and paste text from the file (unless restricted by the file’s security settings) and search for text in the file. Converting these types of files to a fully editable (and translatable) format, such as a Word file, is less problematic than with image-based files, though not necessarily simple. → continue reading

THE TRANSMUG REPORT – AN IPAD IN THE FUTURE OF THE MAC

BY YVES AVÉROUS

Unless you have been living in a cave for the past 9 months, you cannot help but know that the iPad is a huge success, from New York to London and Paris to Shanghai. Last fall, when Apple revealed its new MacBook Air lineup, this product line claimed its place as heir to the iPad, becoming the new benchmark for all things Mac in the upcoming year.

First, the hardware: The new MacBook Air models have built-in flash storage, not to be confused with the Solid State Drives that are now so 2010! Like the iPad, the MacBook Air provides features that we have been wanting for a long time, but that were not readily available due to the high cost of the components that allow today’s feats: no moving parts, quick start and app launch, instant resume from sleep, and extra-long hibernation period—up to 30 days! The iconic 12″ PowerBook of yesteryear finally has a more than worthy heir in the super sexy 11″ MacBook Air. Amazingly, that machine with its low clock rate processor still manages to outperform the previous generation Air. See those benchmark results. → continue reading