Hazards in Translating Bits and Bytes, Scams, Cloning Clooney, and More — Translorial Spring 2017 Edition

Translorial Spring 2017 Vol 39, Nr. 1

NCTA members can download the Spring 2017 edition of the Translorial in print and downloadable PDF versions, covering a variety of topics.

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Table of contents of the Translorial Spring 2017 edition, Vol. 39, No. 1: → continue reading

THE TRANSMUG REPORT – THERE’S A NEW LION IN TOWN

Unless you have built a wall against all sorts of Apple® marketing, you cannot ignore that the new version of OS X® is out. The Lion has lost its mane, changed latitudes and is now a Mountain Lion! Version 10.8 of our favorite operating system comes with more than 200 new features, or so they say. This count includes many tweaks and also major enhancements. → continue reading

THE MAPUCHE PEOPLE TELL TALES

Rufina Suntul de Kurüinka, who provided information to Bertha Koessler.A tale of multiculturalism: a German researcher comes to Argentine Patagonia and records the tales of the indigenous Mapuche people. BY LIESELOTTE SCHWARZENBERG, PH.D.

The long years of patient work by Bertha Koessler née Ilg in San Martin de Los Andes, Argentina, collecting the tales of the Mapuche people are finally being recognized, as a new edition of the Spanish translation was finally launched in May 2007 in Santiago, Chile. Frau Bertha originally translated and recorded the stories from the Mapudungun language to her native German. → continue reading

HOW TO DO IT OR DO IT EVEN BETTER

BOOK REVIEW BY SHARLEE MERNER BRADLEY

Corinne McKay is well known to ATA members for her presentations at the annual conference, her activities in the French Division, and her online course, “Getting Started as a Freelance Translator.”

In this valuable book she fulfills her intention of introducing would-be translators to the business and the profession so they can judge whether it is right for them. The chapters include an overview of the translation business, how to get started, how to set up a home office, how to establish rates and terms of service, and, finally, what to do to expand. → continue reading

Translation Contract: A Standards-based Model Solution

Review by Stafford Hemmer

Translation Contract: A Standards-based Model Solution by Uwe Muegge, 100 pages, Authorhouse, 2005, ISBN: 1418416363

Translation Contract: A Standards-Based Model Solution is a toolkit in book form. Author Uwe Mr. Muegge dices the contractual relationship between translation buyer and vendor into a collection of checklists and work order forms. Using DIN 2345, ÖNORM D, and ASTM F15.48 standards, Mr. Muegge aims at four basic goals: improving communication between translation vendors and translation buyers, structuring and standardizing translation projects, improving efficiency, and improving quality. His intended audience includes “translation buyers and vendors who do not have comprehensive contractual agreements in place … and [those] who do not have much experience in the translation and/or localization field.” If this toolkit were presented in electronic form, it would be a hit. But in its present book form, Translation Contract misses its mark.

At skeptical first glance, publisher AuthorHouse should have considered condensing the booklet prior to its publication. “Section A: Master Data,” a full 21 of the booklet’s 100 pages, is a sparse presentation of basic contract elements that could have all fit into a one-page form. Indeed, the data fields presented in this section are obvious requisites to any valid and enforceable translation contract. But do neophyte freelancers or contract-deficient agencies really need four pages of prompting lest they forget to incorporate buyer and vendor contact info into their newly structured contracts?

The meat is in Sections B-H. Mr. Muegge guides readers on identifying and defining translation services, documents, textual and formal considerations, hardware and software used, additional agreements, and review procedures. Each section starts with a one-sentence “overview” of the objective; for example, “Section E: Formal Considerations. In this section, the contractual partners reach agreement on specific formal aspects of the translation project.” Here, Mr. Muegge succeeds in highlighting salient contract issues that users can take into consideration when structuring translation projects and contracts. The three-page “Appendix: Overview of Translation-Related Standards” adds value by filtering ISO standards, and listing references to Internet-based resources, thereby perhaps warranting the booklet’s $15.50 cover price. Still, the two-page set of definitions that preface the book, including such gems as, “target language: A target language is a natural language. Translation professionals use a target language to translate to,” could do with a little polish.

Mr. Muegge’s comprehensive approach is important for closing the loopholes found in various model contracts, such as those from ATA. Perhaps, then, the only thing wrong with this book is precisely that: it’s a book. His target audience certainly would have been better served if he delivered Translation Contract as a software product, because that data medium would enable the author to deliver the comprehensiveness he seeks to provide. In addition to presenting a useable boilerplate contract, the checklists and work order forms would then become more valuable to users because they could then be downloaded and modified. Mr. Muegge could also spend more time fleshing out the terminology, and delivering more information about the translation-related standards upon which the booklet is based, rather than just list them. If, in the future, Mr. Muegge decides to present Translation Contract in electronic format, he’ll be sure to hit the bull’s-eye.

PC Hardware AnnoyancesHow to Fix the Most Annoying Things About Your Computer Hardware

by Stephen J. Bigelow
Book review by Yves Avérous

When my cousin eventually decided to buy a PC after weeks of my twisting his arm to get a Mac, I told him: “I’m sorry, you are on your own. After years of troubleshooting my PCs I have not switched to the Mac only to plunge back into ‘dll hell’ again.”

Still, I try to be considerate towards my fellow PC users. Not all of you have a choice—especially if you have been enslaved by single-platform solutions or still believe, against all odds, that it’s more convenient to use a PC. And some of you cannot even be swayed by the fact that there aren’t any known viruses for the Mac operating system and that the system is immune to spyware! So what’s a good friend to do when facing so much resistance to common sense? Offer the next best thing to his own helping hand: PC Hardware Annoyances from O’Reilly, by longtime tech guru Stephen J. Bigelow.

As suggested by its title, PC Hardware Annoyances deals with the most common computer issues in the area of home office computing, with close to 600 questions overall (dare I say “plug and play?”). Drivers, connectors, cards, ports, settings, graphics (cards, monitors, etc.), sound (cards, microphone, speakers, even iPod,), hard drives, CD/DVD drives, networks, printers and scanners … how many times have you wished you could make sense (or better sense) out of those? With 17 years of experience talking about computers to the lay public, Bigelow knows how to make things light and simple. Of course, some areas, such as the BIOS, cannot always be dealt with elegantly: “… the Phoenix/Award BIOS version used with the Tyan Tomcat i7210 (S5112) Pentium 4 “Northwood” or “Prescott” motherboard provides a Quick Power On Self Test option in the Advanced BIOS Features menu …” Poetry not quite in motion. Fortunately, this comes with an illustration.

The question-and-answer approach — sort of a printed FAQ — is not my favorite format, but the publishers of this book have implemented it brilliantly, with easy-to-read “tip” and “warning” boxes, short definitions inserted strategically, and a plethora of screenshots and illustrations. It all conspires to make this smart and friendly book a valuable tool for the average to experienced Windows XP user. In the end, PC Hardware Annoyances can not only help you, but also help you help others.

Even though I tend to generally pick the big “bible” kind of manual when I choose a tech book—well-organized hierarchical opuses like the Missing Manual collection from O’Reilly, for example, for my critical apps like OS X or Office (Mac)—I must admit that PC Hardware Annoyances does a good job at corralling most of the support you might need in a manner that is logically organized and easily digestible.

Another virtue of this book is to remind me how fortunate I am now, as a Mac user, not to need this kind of extensive help anymore.

PC Hardware Annoyances: How to Fix the Most Annoying Things About Your Computer Hardware;
by Stephen J. Bigelow, 268 pages, O’Reilly Media, 2005, ISBN: 0596007159.