THE TRANSMUG REPORT — THE END OF THE LINE

BY YVES AVÉROUS

WWDC MMXIIIAt WWDC  in June 2013, Apple finally broke the silence on their latest secrets: new operating systems for the Mac® and iDevices,  a long awaited radio service, a sneak peek at a futuristic Mac Pro® soon to be built in Texas, a preview of a Web-based iWork®, and updated MacBook Airs® with brand new Wi-Fi base stations to fit their new, faster specs. → continue reading

FIELD KNOWLEDGE

tl_35-1_web_page20_image64

Tuomas Kostiainen’s workshop serves up valuable instruction for improving skills and efficiency in Trados Studio—even if you think you already know it all!
BY SUSAN ROSE

Translation software (i.e. computer-assisted translation, or CAT) in the translation industry is the equivalent of a hammer in construction: it is essential. And if you’re doing business in a large commercial sector, Trados is the standard—at least for now. → continue reading

BOOMERANG-TRANSLATING ON THE INTERNET

Auto-translation tools are increasingly used for quick translations; but once thrown, will the boomerang return to its originator or spin wildly off into an incomprehensible back translation?

An abundance of free translation services are available online; but what do you get for free? Will a simple sentence auto-translate cleanly across multiple languages? Or will the end result bear little resemblance to the original language? BY SARA GREENWALD

Most translators are all too familiar with the “free instant translation” services available online. I tried boomerang-translating, first using a translation website to translate from English to a target language, and then back-translating to English. Doing this shows what happens when the peculiarities of English are stripped away. If an English phrase or construction doesn’t have an exact counterpart in the target language, the translator has to make decisions based on meaning. When the translator and back-translator are making decisions based on words and phrases in their databases, the result can be pretty odd. → continue reading

THE TRANSLORIAL TOOL KIT

The Tool Kit is an online newsletter that comes to its subscribers’ mailboxes twice a month. In Translorial, we offer a quarterly digest of Jost’s most helpful tips from the past season. BY JOST ZETZSCHE © 2012 INTERNATIONAL WRITERS’ GROUP, COMPILED BY YVES AVÉROUS

Refactored memoQ
Rather than just looking at the new features of recent tools and versions of memoQ, I chatted with the developers to get some of the background story. I met with István and Gábor to hear them out about version 6. → continue reading

A CAT IN A SACK (I.E. A PIG IN A POKE)?

The Russian idiom “buying a cat in a sack” means the same as the English idiom “buying a pig in a poke.”

Will tools typically used for analytical translations prove efficacious for fiction and poetry? A literary translator learns about CAT tools and considers their application in her own field. BY ANNE O. FISHER

For some time now I have been curious about CAT (Computer-Assisted Translation) tools and whether they would be useful for someone who translates primarily fiction and poetry. Unlike translators in other fields, literary translators are almost never required by their “clients” (publishers, poets, grant-distributing associations) to use CAT tools, but maybe there’s something we’re missing if we don’t? The NCTA CAT tools workshop on November 12th, 2011, was a good introduction to what these tools do and a great way to get specific information in a short time for not a lot of money. As for the particular applicability of CAT tools to literary translation, it seems that there is less to fear, and more reason to use them, than I thought. → continue reading

APPROACHES TO MEMOQ

Tuomas Kostiainen explains the basics of memoQ.

New to MemoQ? Help is available for every learning style.
BY MICHAEL WAHLSTER

I had to get up early on Saturday, February 25, to catch the first flight from L.A. to San Francisco where I attended Tuomas Kostiainen’s NCTA memoQ workshop at the SFSU downtown campus.

Just in case you missed it: memoQ is a translation memory tool developed by the Hungarian company Kilgray Translation Technologies. I became aware of it around 2009, mainly through blog posts and tweets by translators located in Europe. The program was generally described as easy to use and competitively priced, but translators were most impressed, it seemed, with the rapid response of Kilgray to users’ support requests. → continue reading