Domestic and Overseas Vietnamese and More – Translorial Spring 2020 Edition

Translorial Spring 2020 Cover page

NCTA members can now enjoy the latest edition of Translorial in print and downloadable PDF versions, covering a variety of topics. If you are not an NCTA member, you can join here.
 
 

Selected articles from Translorial Spring, Vol. 42, No. 1:
 
 

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Interview of Sharlee Bradley by Miriam Mustain

by Miriam Mustain

This is an updated version (January 2020) of an older interview from 2000, which can be found here.

NCTA Event 2017

L to R: Sylvia Korwek, Martin Hoffman, Merav Rozenblum and son Arial, and Sharlee Bradley at an NCTA event in San Francisco, November 2017.

Q1. How did you acquire your languages? (This may lead to other questions)

Our parents encouraged their children to study French as the world language, now perhaps an old-fashioned view. I started with the first course offered, French in the eighth grade in California. Latin was not given until the ninth grade. That made five years of French and four of Latin before college.

During World War II when the United Nations Charter was signed in San Francisco, my mother suggested how wonderful it would be to interpret for them. But that was never my goal. Instead I fell in love with the written word and from the beginning played at translating whatever literature we studied in school and more besides.

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Transcreation in the Luxury Sector and More – Translorial Spring 2019 Edition

Translorial Spring 2019

NCTA members can now enjoy the latest edition of Translorial in print and downloadable PDF versions, covering a variety of topics. If you are not an NCTA member, you can join here.

Selected articles from Translorial Spring 2019, Vol. 41, No. 1:

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Interview with Susan Vo – Part 2

By Jonathan Goldberg

Note from the editors: We are taking the unusual step of presenting this interview of interpreter Susan Vo by Jonathan Goldberg in two parts, the first covering her early life and introduction to the interpreting profession, and the second covering her work as an interpreter at the Khmer Rouge Tribunal. Publishing the interview in two parts also resolves the issue of length: as it stands, the text is quite a bit longer than our limits for Translorial.com articles, which we set for online readability.

While the two halves of this long interview reveal Vo’s depth as an interpreter, each can stand alone in its own right. The insights she shares in Part 2 were directly influenced by her early life. Growing up in a culture other than her own, which she knew only secondhand through her parents and other refugees, she came to understand her Vietnamese birth culture more fully by comparison with that of her adopted country (Canada). This might well have given her the perspective that made her capable of an ethical approach to persons who had done great harm: no culture is without its moral outliers.

We see the parallels between Vo’s professional life and the panel discussion about ethics in interpreting conducted by 6 experienced interpreters at the NCTA September 8 General Meeting. The panel was held in response to the impassioned discussion about the role of interpreters in crucial political meetings, sparked by the circumstances surrounding the Putin–Trump summit earlier this year. The Khmer Rouge Tribunal took place after the fact; the Helsinki summit between two world powers has portent for the future. Part 1 of this interview reveals how Vo reached an understanding of differences between cultures; Part 2 brings the past into the present and the future, emphasizing the importance of skill and ethical stance in interpreting.

You can find part 1 here. A French translation of this interview is available on Jonathan Goldberg’s blog, Le mot juste en anglais, here. → continue reading

Interview with Susan Vo – Part 1

By Jonathan Goldberg

Note from the editors: We are taking the unusual step of presenting this interview of interpreter Susan Vo by Jonathan Goldberg in two parts, the first covering her early life and introduction to the interpreting profession, and the second covering her work as an interpreter at the Khmer Rouge Tribunal. Publishing the interview in two parts also resolves the issue of length: as it stands, the text is quite a bit longer than our limits for Translorial.com articles, which we set for online readability.

While the two halves of this long interview reveal Vo’s depth as an interpreter, each can stand alone in its own right. The insights she shares in Part 2 were directly influenced by her early life. Growing up in a culture other than her own, which she knew only secondhand through her parents and other refugees, she came to understand her Vietnamese birth culture more fully by comparison with that of her adopted country (Canada). This might well have given her the perspective that made her capable of an ethical approach to persons who had done great harm: no culture is without its moral outliers. → continue reading

TRANSLATION AND POSTCOLONIALISM

Translation and interpreting have a fascinating historical role in the development of empire and the postcolonial world. AN INTERVIEW BY THOMAS J. CORBETT

The work of Robert J. C. Young, Julius Silver Professor of English & Comparative Literature at New York University, concerns marginalized peoples and cultures. Postcolonialism: A Very Short Introduction devotes its final chapter to translation. Translation is seen not only as a colonial activity but also as a metaphor: transplanting England to New England, for example, is itself a form of translation. The interview began with an oblique question, a question that provoked a typically original and enlightening response from Professor Young. → continue reading