The Principle of Confidentiality – Do interpreters have the right to remain silent?

By Monica Lange

The Principle of Confidentiality

Members of our panel (L to R): Angie Birchfield, Andrea Hofmann-Miller, Johanna Parker, Robert Finnegan, moderator Olivia Reinshagen-Hernandez, Holly Mikkelson, and NCTA Events Co-Directors Monica Lange and Fernanda Brandão-Galea.

I will never forget my first meetup with the Linguists, Translators and Interpreters from the Bay Area. I had recently moved to California and wanted to connect with colleagues in San Francisco. It was there that I first heard about NCTA. I joined the association a couple of weeks later, and I dare say it was one of the best things I have ever done. I have learned so much and met so many amazing people at NCTA’s General Meetings, workshops, and meetups. Among everything NCTA has to offer, I personally believe the General Meetings are its most generous gift.

For the September General Meeting, NCTA brought together a panel of high-level interpreters: Angie Birchfield, Johanna Parker, Holly Mikkelson, Andrea Hofmann-Miller, Robert Finnegan, and panel moderator Olivia Reinshagen-Hernandez. The topic discussed was a very important one for interpreters and translators: interpreter–client privilege, or our right to remain silent. With the Global Climate Action Summit just a few days away, a crowd was protesting on the streets of San Francisco—and the big names on our panel brought a crowd of our own to the NCTA meeting, including a group of interpreting students from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies who had driven up from Monterey. → continue reading

Translation Scams Reloaded and More – Translorial Fall 2018 Edition

Translorial Fall 2018 Edition

NCTA members can now enjoy the latest edition of Translorial in print and downloadable PDF versions, covering a variety of topics.


If you are not an NCTA member, you can join here.

 
 

Selected articles from Translorial Fall 2018, Vol. 40, No. 2: → continue reading

Protecting Interpreters and Their Clients: An Introduction to the Interpreters Guild of America

By Johanna Valle Sobalvarro

Protecting Interpreters and Their Clients

The Interpreters Guild of America (IGA) is a unit of the NewsGuild-CWA, a union representing journalists, interpreters and translators, social justice workers, and nonprofit and public-sector professionals. Its main purpose is to protect the rights of interpreters, who bear tremendous responsibilities and are vulnerable to a number of professional challenges. → continue reading

The Great War, Translating Macron, Looking Back, Thinking Ahead, and More – Translorial 40th Anniversary Edition Spring 2018

40th Anniversary Translorial

NCTA members can now enjoy the latest edition of Translorial in print and downloadable PDF versions, covering a variety of topics. This edition celebrates the 40th anniversary of Translorial, which was established in 1978. You can find the very first edition from May 1978 in the NCTA archive (members only). Publicly accessible articles from 1978 can be found here.

If you are not an NCTA member, you can join here.

 

Table of contents of the 40th Anniversary Translorial Spring 2018 edition, Vol. 40, No. 1: → continue reading

Case Study: How to Ensure GDPR Compliance When Undertaking a Translation Project

By Monique Longton

Please note: This document is for informational purposes only and must not be construed as legal advice. Both the client and the translator are advised to consult with their lawyers and legal advisers before they undertake a translation project that falls under the GDPR.

Introduction

The General Data Protection Regulation (the “Regulation” or “GDPR”) will be enforceable as of May 25, 2018. The Regulation aims to strengthen the rights of European Union residents with regard to their personal data. → continue reading

Quality Control in Translation: Must-Dos for Success as a Translator

by Monique Longton

If you are considering starting – or have just started – a career in the translation industry, this article may be for you.

Here’s a challenge: if you had to choose a picture to describe the actual process taking place inside your brain when you translate, what would you pick? Personally, I would go for two pictures of one bridge: the London Bridge in Lake Havasu City, Arizona.

The old London Bridge spanning the River Thames in England

The old London Bridge spanning the River Thames in England

The London Bridge today, in Lake Havasu City, Arizona

The London Bridge today, in Lake Havasu City, Arizona

Photos courtesy of the Lake Havasu City Convention & Visitors Bureau
→ continue reading